Archaeologists In Italy Unearthed 300 Roman Gold Coins – And The Treasure Could Be Worth Millions

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Image: Fabrizio Villa/Getty Images
Image: Fabrizio Villa/Getty Images

And out of the creative explosion that was the Renaissance came a new art form: Opera. Combining dance, music and poetry, this type of sung drama became all the fashion across Italy. Indeed, by the 17th century, the rest of Europe had fallen for it, too. Having been performed mostly for courts during its early days, it soon took off among the general public, helping fuel it’s spread.

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Image: ullstein bild/ullstein bild/Getty Images
Image: ullstein bild/ullstein bild/Getty Images

Opera was so popular, in fact, that theaters began to appear all across Italy. And in 1870 one such venue opened its doors in the town of Como. Called the Cressoni Theater, it staged productions of Rigoletto and The Barber of Seville among others. But it wasn’t just a high-brow venue. Its program also included wrestling and magicians.

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