20 Bizarre Pieces Of Marriage Advice That Victorian-Era Women Were Compelled To Follow

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Image: Stanzman
Image: Stanzman

The Victorian era saw the publication of a positive deluge of advice books aimed at the young bride-to-be and the newly married woman. Much of the material confirms the stereotype we have of the Victorians, especially the upper classes. Judging by these books, they do seem to be a straitlaced lot when it came to sexual matters. But most shocking of all to modern sensibilities are the casual assumptions of male superiority. Read on and prepare to be outraged!

Image: The Bridgeman Art Library
Image: The Bridgeman Art Library

20. At least a rudimentary knowledge of biology

It was assumed that most of the young women that the Victorian guides on marriage were aimed at would be from the upper-middle or middle classes. And from that supposition sprung the quite reasonable idea that these young women’s knowledge of basic biology was scant if it existed at all.

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Image: George Hayter
Image: George Hayter

And what awaited a young woman on her wedding night was likely to be even more of a mystery, perhaps a rather terrifying one. Walter Gallichan, writing in his 1918 The Psychology of Marriage advised that, “It is necessary that the virgin should not enter the married state without even theoretical knowledge of sex.” Alarmingly, he went on to say in relation to the wedding night, “Now and then one reads a painful report of suicide at this crisis in a girl’s life.”

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