After Being Shipwrecked On A Sub-Antarctic Island, Five Men Survived As Castaways For Over A Year

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Image: NOAA/Institute for Exploration/University of Rhode Island (NOAA/IFE/URI)

Museum-goers and historians alike are also often captivated by tales of long-lost shipwrecks. Perhaps the most famous of these was the Titanic. Believed to be the world’s most advanced ship at the time, the cruise liner tragically sank during her maiden voyage after hitting an iceberg, killing more than 1,500 people.

Image: Christopher Down

Of course, it’s not only natural factors that cause shipwrecks: many vessels have also sunk as a result of war. Take the famous Tudor battleship The Mary Rose, for instance, which French forces sunk in 1545 off the coast of the Isle of Wight in England. Centuries later experts salvaged the shipwreck, and visitors now flock to see its remnants at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

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Image: Enrapture Captivating Media

Meanwhile, the Maori of New Zealand have stories about sunken ships in the region. Indeed, the latitude there earned it the nickname “the furious fifties” – and not by accident. Due to the harsh westerly winds that roar across the Southern Ocean, many ships have fallen foul of the seas and not completed their voyages.

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