After Tourists On A Safari Spotted An Elephant, They Suddenly Realized They Were In Grave Danger

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Image: YouTube/Nat Geo WILD
Image: YouTube/Nat Geo WILD

On a sunny morning in January 2018, a group of tourists were on safari in Botswana’s Chobe National Park. Sightseers got a treat when a cute baby elephant and its mother popped out from a clearing. But their admiration turned to fear after the majestic beasts began attacking the truck they were in.

Image: i_pinz
Image: i_pinz

Botswana’s Chobe National Park spans an area of around 11,700 square kilometers. It was the first of its kind in the country. And since its inception in 1968, it has become renowned for its vast elephant population. As such, 170,000 tourists head to the spot every year.

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Image: Max Pixel
Image: Max Pixel

However, this hasn’t always been the case. The 19th century saw an unprecedented slaughter of animals in the country, due to poaching by Europeans and locals. Indeed, by 1890 a large amount of the country’s game had been wiped out, and it took almost 80 years for elephant numbers to fully recover.

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