A Top Plastic Surgeon Used An Ancient Greek Formula To Determine The Most Beautiful Royal

Who’s the most beautiful royal of all time? It’s a question you’d expect could only be answered subjectively. And yet leading plastic surgeon Dr. Julian De Silva claims that he can settle the debate once and for all using the latest technology – and an ancient mathematical method known as the Golden Ratio.

Dr. De Silva appears to know what he’s talking about, too. The surgeon began his career studying at U.K. institutions such as St. Thomas’ Medical School and London Teaching Hospital. After specializing at the University of California in plastic surgery, he landed an anatomy tutoring position with King’s College in his home city of London. De Silva then moved to a senior position in the testing field of ophthalmic surgery.

Since then, De Silva has opened his own medical center on London’s world-famous Harley Street. His expertise is in facial procedures and his operations are renowned for their quick recovery times. His efforts have also seen him land the Imperial College gold medal for research, certifications from U.S., U.K. and European boards and Best Doctor nominations from his associates.

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Furthermore, De Silva is also something of a philanthropist. He’s worked in Africa, South America and Asia to provide treatments considered as life-changing for communities with limited medical facilities. Changing Faces, Medical Sans Frontieres and Fight for Sight are just a few of the charities the surgeon has aligned himself with.

And in 2020 De Silva decided to use his considerable skills to answer a question many considered unanswerable: who’s the most beautiful royal ever to have lived? Alongside his vast knowledge of the facial form, the surgeon also adopted a method known as the Golden Ratio to help him in his quest.

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The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi, to give its full name, became popular in the period known as the European Renaissance. It refers to the equation used by architects and artists to help them achieve true greatness in their works. Moreover, it can be applied to pretty much anything, not just the human form.

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Although often used as a tool by creatives, the Golden Ratio has also regularly been adopted by the more academically minded. Some believe it can even be applied to determine exactly how beautiful an individual is. And this involves dividing the dimensions of the width and length of an individual’s face.

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The Golden Ratio dictates that the closer a person’s figure is to the number Phi, aka 1.618, the greater the chance that they can objectively describe themselves as beautiful. To achieve the kind of beauty that’s in another league to the rest of us mere mortals, however, individuals must also possess two other traits. These are perfect facial proportion and symmetry.

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These qualities are determined by further dimensions, including from the base of the nose to the lowest part of the chin and from between the eyes to the hairline. If these are the same, then the person in question is well on the way to being crowned a god or goddess of beauty. The test doesn’t end there, though.

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To be regarded as one of the world’s most attractive people, an individual’s nose and ear must also be of an identical length. And the breadth of an eye should also be the same as the space from one eye to another. But how exactly did the Golden Ratio gain traction as a credible theory?

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Well, it became significantly popular in the early 16th century thanks to a book named The Divine Proportion. Penned by Luca Pacioli, a math scholar of the Italian Renaissance, it used Leonardo da Vinci’s art to show how the Golden Ratio can produce great art. The celebrated painter was one of the most fervent advocates of the theory at the time.

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“The Mona Lisa” was just one of several iconic works created by da Vinci by employing the Golden Ratio. However, some believe that it was best utilized for “The Vitruvian Man.” Here, the Renaissance artist adopted the rule to paint what he considered to be a scientifically ideal human form.

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Indeed, da Vinci was so committed to the Golden Ratio that he even employed it when designing buildings for a town in Italy. According to research conducted by The Guardian’s Jonathan Jones, the artist “believed so passionately in the power of proportion that he thought it could make a castle invulnerable.” And da Vinci isn’t the only notable name to subscribe to the theory.

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Fellow Italian Renaissance painter Michelangelo also used the Golden Ratio in some of his work. The rule has been adapted by more contemporary artistic greats such as Salvador Dali and Le Corbusier, too. And everything from the design of the Giza Pyramids to the Apple logo is said to have incorporated the Golden Ratio.

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Of course, the origins of the Golden Ratio date back much further than the days of Leonardo da Vinci. It was in fact first proposed by the ancient Greeks, who believed that 1.618 was the perfect number for a rectangle’s width. Taking its title from one of the era’s most prominent sculptors, Phidias, the use of Phi can be seen in many of the Greek columns that still stand today.

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More than 2,000 years on and the credibility of the Golden Ratio is still going strong, as evident by Dr. Julian De Silva’s royal studies. So, which famous faces made the leading surgeon’s all-important list? Well, in fifth place stands one of the most recent additions to the British monarchy: Kate Middleton.

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In his findings, De Silva wrote, “Kate stands out for having a perfect gap between her nose and lips and very strong eye spacing.” The Duchess of Cambridge achieved a score of 86.8 percent on the Golden Ratio. De Silva added, “She is a striking woman and her scores mark her out as one of the most beautiful women in the world.”

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If you’re wondering why Kate didn’t receive a higher score, then there were two specific features that let her down. According to De Silva, the Duchess doesn’t have as strong a jawline and chin as the royal who finished in pole position. Nonetheless, the future Queen’s other assets still helped her to place higher than the majority of her relatives.

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In fact, Kate was beaten to fourth place by less than one percent. And the woman responsible is, perhaps rather awkwardly, her sister-in-law and one of the most controversial additions to the royal family in recent history. Yes, Meghan Markle finished just outside the top three with a Golden Ratio score of 87.4%

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Although the Duchess of Sussex mightn’t have placed in the top spot today, De Silva believes she would’ve done if the research had been conducted back in Ancient Greece. He wrote, “Meghan has beautiful facial symmetry and gets closer than any other princess to having what the Greeks considered the perfect face.”

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“Meghan has an almost perfectly shaped nose with a 98.5% score,” De Silva continued. “Her eye position is exactly right and she has a gorgeous V-shaped or heart-shaped chin, which is the shape women most covet.” Of course, there are some royal followers who no doubt believe that Meghan shouldn’t have even been included in the surgeon’s results.

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In early 2020 Meghan and her husband Prince Harry shocked the world when they revealed they’d be stepping back as members of the royal family. The pair stated that they wanted to establish financial self-sufficiency as they embarked on a new life in North America. Nonetheless, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will still spend time in the U.K. to carry out various charitable duties.

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Although Meghan wasn’t crowned the most beautiful royal of all time, she does hold the honor of being the highest-placed living member of the British monarchy. As well as bettering Kate Middleton, the Duchess’s Golden Ratio was also found to be higher than the rest of her in-laws. These included Zara Phillips, Princess Anne’s daughter, who achieved a percentage of 81.6.

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Elsewhere, Princess Beatrice was given a Golden Ratio of 80.7 percent. This was just ahead of her younger sister, Princess Eugenie, who achieved a still respectable score of 79.3 percent. De Silva wrote, “Meghan and Kate both really stood out and got significantly higher marks than the three other princesses.”

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In the end, though, it was two royals who are sadly no longer with us who bookended the top three. Grace Kelly was placed third with 88.8 percent. The style icon first found fame as an actress in Hollywood before marrying Prince Rainier of Monaco, becoming a princess in the process. Tragically, Kelly was killed in an automobile crash in 1982.

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De Silva wrote in his findings, “Princess Grace has a timeless beauty and had the highest scores for her eye spacing and her eye position is almost perfect with a score of 99.8%. Her stunning lips also scored the highest. She lost marks for her chin, which is a little indistinct.”

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The individual who placed above Kelly might not be familiar to casual royalists, however. Achieving a score of 88.9 percent, Rania Al Yassin first worked in banking before walking down the aisle with Prince Abdullah bin Al Hussein in 1993. She assumed her more familiar moniker, Queen Rania of Jordan, six years later when her husband became king.

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“Queen Rania is the most beautiful living royal and a stunningly attractive woman,” De Silva commented. “She had the highest marks of all for her classically shaped chin and also scored highly for her lips. She was marked down for her nose width and her brow area.”

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In the end, the title of the most beautiful royal to have ever lived was a very close call. Just one percent, in fact, separated the winner, the runner-up Queen Rania of Jordan and third-placed Grace Kelly. So, who received 89.05 percent to claim victory by the tightest of margins?

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Perhaps unsurprisingly, it was the late Princess Diana who came out on top. The People’s Princess was credited with bringing the royal family into the modern age during her turbulent marriage to Prince Charles. Of course, back in 1997, she famously lost her life in an automobile accident, just like Grace Kelly.

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So, why exactly does De Silva consider the former Princess of Wales to be more beautiful than any other royal past and present? Well, the surgeon states that her highest score came with her nose base and lip width at 96.6 percent. Close behind was her eye position, which received a percentage of 94.

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Diana also received scores in the 90s for her brow area and forehead. Considered slightly less perfect were her nose width and length, which were given 86.9 percent, and her overall face shape at 85 percent. The latter was, in fact, the lowest mark she received during the whole process.

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Of course, Diana was still nearly a full 11 percent away from achieving total perfection. And De Silva believes that her lips and chin are the qualities that let her down the most. He wrote, “Her lips are a little thin and ill-defined and her chin is less classical than some of the other women.”

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In his conclusion, De Silva remarked, “Diana, Meghan and Kate are all very beautiful women. But when measured against the Greeks’ Golden Ratio of physical perfection, Princess Diana comes out on top. She was several points ahead of Meghan and Kate and just pipped the stunningly attractive Queen Rania to the title of most beautiful royal of all time.”

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De Silva used cutting-edge technology to ensure his Golden Ratio list was as accurate as possible. As well as calculating each royal’s face shape digitally, he also assessed the length and width of their eyes, lips, chins, jaws and noses. However, not everyone agreed with his results.

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A comment on the Daily Mail’s report about the findings read, “I don’t think Diana was beautiful at all. She was pretty and photogenic but not beautiful, in the same way Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis wasn’t beautiful. It was just media hype, their position in society and culture that made you believe it.”

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But another reader of the same site believed that De Silva’s research had got it right. They argued, “I think Diana and Grace were the most pretty. Rania and other recent ones have had way too much work done. When it comes to heart and great work, Diana wins.”

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And it appears as though Diana has passed on her attractive genes to her two sons. Although he didn’t make the top five overall, her eldest son William was named the second most attractive male royal with 80.9 percent. The future king beat Princess Anne’s son Peter Phillips and her son-in-law Mike Tindall in the process.

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Furthermore, Diana’s youngest son Harry went one better, achieving a not-too-shabby score of 81.4 percent. This echoes the pattern of his and brother William’s respective wives, with Meghan Markle narrowly finishing ahead of Kate Middleton. So, why is the Duke of Sussex considered the ultimate royal male pinup?

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In his research, De Silva explained that Harry’s chin shape is particularly attractive. De Silva also praised “the near-perfect length of his face, the gap between his nose and lips and his eye spacing.” But the surgeon added that like his late mother, the prince’s thin lips are his Achilles’ heel.

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